Course Structure

MAJOR PROGRAMMES

B.Sc and B.Sc (Hons) in Physics

Physics is one of the most fundamental of all sciences, and is the basis of our scientific knowledge of the physical world. It seeks to explain the behaviour of matter, time and space in the universe and covers phenomena ranging from subnuclear interactions to cosmological events like the Big Bang. The traditional B.Sc. degree in Physics is centred on understanding scientific fundamentals and it is through this basic approach that advances in scientific knowledge and technological innovations have been made.


Programme Structure & Curriculum Rationale

B.Sc. (Hons.) and B.Sc. in Physics is a rigorous course covering the core topics in physics. The broadness of the scope and the training in critical thinking and in analysis will enable graduates to choose from a wide variety of careers. B.Sc. (Hons.) students can choose to specialise in one of the following areas: : (i) Astrophysics, (ii) Nanophysics and (iii) Quantum Technologies. These programmes will prepare graduates with in-depth knowledge in each area of specialisation.


Career Prospects

The Physics Department, which has research strengths in many frontier areas including nanoscience, quantum information technology, optical and magnetic materials, and biophysics, provides a stimulating learning environment for all students who wish to major in physics. Physics graduates will be able to embark on career paths in R&D in the physical sciences, engineering industries and microelectronics industries, as well as education and training, government scientific services sectors and IT. The unique problem solving skills our graduates acquire have enabled them to work and succeed in commerce, banking and finance.


Graduation Requirements

To be awarded a B.Sc. or B.Sc. (Hons.) with a primary major in Physics, candidates must satisfy the following:

Module Level Major Requirements Cumulative Major MCs

Level-1000
(24 MCs)

- PC1141 Introduction to Classical Mechanics
- PC1142 Introduction to Thermodynamics and Optics
- PC1143 Introduction to Electricity and Magnetism
- PC1144 Introduction to Modern Physics
- MA1101R Linear Algebra I
- MA1102R Calculus

24

Level-2000
(24 MCs)

- PC2130 Quantum Mechanics I
- PC2131 Electricity and Magnetism I
- PC2132 Classical Mechanics
- PC2134 Mathematical Methods in Physics I
- PC2193 Experimental Physics I
- PC2230 Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics

48

Level-3000
(19-20 MCs)

- PC3130 Quantum Mechanics II
- PC3193 Experimental Physics II

And any three modules from the following electives:

- PC3231 Electricity and Magnetism II
- PC3232 Nuclear and Particle Physics
- PC3233 Atomic and Molecular Physics I
- PC3235 Solid State Physics I
- PC3236 Computational Methods in Physics
- PC3238 Fluid Dynamics
- PC3241 Solid State Devices
- PC3242 Physics of Semiconductor Processing
- PC3243 Photonics
- PC3246 Astrophysics I
- PC3247 Modern Optics
- PC3251 Nanophysics
- PC3267 Biophysics II
- PC3274 Mathematical Methods in Physics II
- PC3239 Special Problems in Undergraduate Physics II
- PC3288 UROPS in Physics I^
- PC3289 Advanced UROPS in Physics II^
- PC3294 Radiation Laboratory

68

Level-4000
(30-32 MCs)

- PC4199 Honours Project in Physics

And any five modules from the following electives:

- PC4228 Device Physics for Quantum Technologies
- PC4230 Quantum Mechanics III
- PC4240 Solid State Physics II
- PC4241 Statistical Mechanics
- PC4242 Electricity and Magnetism III
- PC4243 Atomic and Molecular Physics II
- PC4245 Particle Physics
- PC4246 Quantum Optics
- PC4248 General Relativity
- PC4249 Astrophysics II
- PC4253 Thin Film Technology
- PC4259 Surface Physics
- PC4262 Remote Sensing
- PC4264 Advanced Solid State Devices
- PC4267 Biophysics III
- PC4268 Biophysical Instrumentation and Biomolecula Electronics
- PC4274 Mathematical Methods in Physics III

100

^ At most 4 MCs of UROPS module may be used to fufil the Physics major requirements.

# These elective modules are only offered to students reading a double degree in Materials Science and Engineering and in Physics.

Note:
Level-4000 PC prefixed modules may be taken to replace up to 8 MCs of the Level-3000 PC elective modules above. In such an event, these Level-4000 modules cannot be counted towards the Level 4000 major requirements.

B.Sc (Hons) students majoring in Physics have the option to qualify for a specialisation in
(1) Astrophysics, or
(2) Nanophysics, or
(3) Quantum Technologies


Level 5000 modules

  • To read a level 5000 module, undergraduate students must seek the approval of the Deputy Head (Education).
  • Level 5000 modules can be used to fulfil the Unrestricted Electives (UE) requirement, but not to fulfil Physics major requirements.
  • If a level 5000 module is used to fulfil undergraduate requirement, it cannot be used to fulfil MSc or PhD requirements in NUS.

 

The total MCs required at each level for graduation for a major in Physics.

Summary of Requirements B.Sc. B.Sc. (Hons.)
University Requirements

20 MC

20 MCs

Faculty Requirements

8 MCs *

8 MCs *

Major Requirements

68 MCs

100 MCs

Unrestricted Elective Modules

24 MCs

32 MCs

Total

120 MCs

160 MCs

* Faculty requirements of 12 MCs and 16 MCs [required for the B.Sc. and B.Sc. (Hons.) programmes respectively] are partially fulfilled through the reading of MA1101R and MA1102R within the major.


Students undertaking the B.Sc. and B.Sc. (Hons.) programmes are required to fulfil the remaining 8 MCs of Faculty requirements from any two of the following subject groups: Computing Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Life Sciences and Multidisciplinary & Interdisciplinary Sciences; but not from the following subject groups: Physical Sciences and Mathematical & Statistical Sciences.

 

 

 


MAJOR PROGRAMMES

Second Major in Physics

The Department of Physics offers a Second Major in Physics which comprises of modules related to the fundamentals of physics as well as its applications. It is open to students with an GCE 'A' Level or H2 pass in Physics or equivalent, who are interested in widening their intellectual horizons or would like to better prepare themselves for future careers.

The second major is not offered with a primary major in Physics

Module Level 2nd Major Requirements Cumulative Major MCs
Level-1000 (16 MCs) Pass in
  • PC1141 Introduction to Classical Mechanics
  • PC1142 Introduction to Thermodynamics and Optics
  • PC1143 Introduction to Electricity & Magnetism
  • PC1144 Introduction to Modern Physics
16
Level-2000 (16 MCs) Pass in
  • PC2130 Quantum Mechanics I
  • PC2131 Electricity and Magnetism I
  • PC2193 Experimental Physics I
Any one from the following
  • PC2132 Classical Mechanics
  • PC2134 Mathematical Methods in Physics I
  • PC2230 Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics
32
Level-3000 (16 MCs) Pass any four from the following
  • PC3130 Quantum Mechanics II
  • PC3193 Experimental Physics II
  • All PC32XX and PC42XX modules that can be used to fulfil the requirements for the Major Programme in Physics.
48

Note: Level-4000 PC prefixed modules may be taken to replace up to 8 MCs of the Level-3000 PC elective modules above.

 

 


DOUBLE DEGREE PROGRAMMES

Double degree programme with Materials Science and Engineering


Discontinuation of the Double Degree Programme in BSc/BSc(Hons) in Physics and BEng(MSE) from Cohorts 17/18 onwards

 

The double degree programme aims to provide a science -driven, engineering-oriented education to both science and engineering students.

Please kindly take note of the following changes in the programme:

A) EE4401 Optoelectronics or EE 4437 PHOTONICS - PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATIONS for cohort AY2013/14 and before.
B) EE4437  PHOTONICS - PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATIONS for cohort AY2014/15 and after.


 

 


DOUBLE DEGREE PROGRAMMES

Joint degree programme with Australian National University (ANU)

Double degree Program with French Grandes Ecoles

 

 


MINOR PROGRAMMES


Nanoscience Minor Programme

  • What is Nanoscience?
  • What is the world like at the nanoscale?
  • What happens when you squeeze an electron?
  • Can we make a device with a single molecule?
  • Can we make a molecular machine?
  • Are self-replicating nanobots possible?

Nanoscience and nanotechnology are the ability to understand and manipulate matter at the molecular level, to create artificial structures at the nanoscale with potentially novel functions.

Structures behave differently when their dimensions are reduced to the range of between one and one hundred nanometers. Such structures exhibit novel and very much improved physical, chemical and biological properties, due entirely to their nanoscopic size. Once we can control feature sizes on the nanometer length scale, it is possible to enhance material properties and device functions beyond those that we presently know or even consider possible.

Nanotechnology is defined as the ability to work at the molecular level, atom by atom, to create large structures with fundamentally new molecular organization.

Nanoscience is an exciting new multidisciplinary realm that brings together the traditional disciplines of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.

The purpose of the Nanoscience Minor programme is to give a comprehensive introduction to the field of nanoscience, and would be suitable not only for students in the sciences and engineering, but also for students from any discipline with an interest in the latest developments in science.

This Nanoscience programme is in keeping with the latest research and technology trends today. An educated layman needs to be kept informed on the latest science and technology trends that could soon revolutionize the world’s economy.

This Minor would be particularly attractive to Physics, Chemistry majors and Engineering students.

To qualify for a Minor in Nanoscience, a student should pass six modules as follows:

  1. Two compulsory Level-1000 modules:
    • (AY2010/2011 or before): CM1101Principles of Modern Chemistry or CM1502 Physical Chemistry for Engineers
    • (Effective AY2011/12): CM1131 Physical Chemistry 1 or CM1502 Physical Chemistry for Engineers and
    • PC1144 Introduction to Modern Physics or PC1432/PC1432X Physics IIE
  2. Two Level-2000 modules:
    • SP2251 Science at the Nanoscale and
    • (AY2010/2011 or before): CM2101 Principles of Spectroscopy or PC2130 Quantum Mechanics 1
    • (Effective AY2012/13): CM2101 Physical Chemistry 2 or PC2130 Quantum Mechanics 1
  3. Two Level-3000 modules:
    • CM3251 Nanochemistry or PC3251 Nanophysics or CM/LSM/PC3288 [Advanced UROPS] * or
    • SP3277 Nano: from Research Bench to Industrial Applications **
      * Must be a Nanoscience-related project
      ** SP3277 involves a compulsory nanotechnology study tour to Japan

Note: Chemistry and Physics majors are only allowed to read at most 3 CM- and 3PC- coded modules respectively; out of which two modules (at most), are allowed to overlap with a student's major requirements.

Implications: Students who are reading Nanoscience minor are able to read SP3277 to fulfil the programme’s elective requirement.


For more information and queries on the programme please contact:

Department of Physics, Sng Wee Lee (Manager)

  • Email: physngwl@nus.edu.sg
  • Office: General Office, S12-M01
  • Tel:+65 6516 2619

or Department of Chemistry

  • Email: chmbox3@nus.edu.sg

 

 


MINOR PROGRAMMES


Minor in Physics

The Department of Physics offers a Minor in Physics which comprises modules related to the fundamentals of physics, leading to a basic understanding of an important area of knowledge. It is aimed at engineering and science students for widening their intellectual horizons and preparing them for greater challenges ahead.

To be awarded a minor in Physics, a student must pass the following six modules:

Applicable to cohort until AY2016/17
  1. Any one from the following:
    • PC1141 Introduction to Classical Mechanics (or PC1433 Mechanics and Waves for ESP students)
    • PC1142 Introduction to Thermodynamics and Optics
    • PC1143 Introduction to Electricity & Magnetism
    • PC1431/PC1431X Physics IE

  2. Any one from the following:
    • PC1144 Introduction to Modern Physics
    • PC1432/PC1432X Physics IIE
    • PC2232 Physics for Electrical Engineers / PC2020 Electromagnetism for Electrical Engineers

  3. Any four modules from the following of which at least two modules must be Level-3000 & above:
    • PC2130 Quantum Mechanics I (or PC2130B Applied Quantum Physics for ESP students)
    • PC2131 Electricity and Magnetism I
    • PC2132 Classical Mechanics
    • PC2134 Mathematical Methods in Physics I
    • PC2230 Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics
    • PC2193 Experimental Physics I
    • PC3130 Quantum Mechanics II
    • PC3193 Experimental Physics II
    • ALL PC32XX and PC42XX modules
Applicable to cohort from AY2017/18 onwards
  1. Any one from the following:
    • PC1141 Introduction to Classical Mechanics (or PC1433 Mechanics and Waves for ESP students)
    • PC1142 Introduction to Thermodynamics and Optics
    • PC1143 Introduction to Electricity & Magnetism
    • PC1431/PC1431X Physics IE

  2. Any one from the following:
    • PC1144 Introduction to Modern Physics
    • PC1432/PC1432X Physics IIE
    • PC2232 Physics for Electrical Engineers

  3. Any four modules from the following of which at least two modules must be Level-3000 & above:
    • PC2130 Quantum Mechanics I (or PC2130B Applied Quantum Physics for ESP students)
    • PC2131 Electricity and Magnetism I / PC2020 Electromagnetism for Electrical Engineers
    • PC2132 Classical Mechanics
    • PC2134 Mathematical Methods in Physics I
    • PC2230 Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics
    • PC2193 Experimental Physics I
    • PC3130 Quantum Mechanics II
    • PC3193 Experimental Physics II
    • ALL PC32XX and PC42XX modules

This minor is not awarded with the primary major in Physics or Physics (with specialisations in Astrophysics or Physics in Nanophysics) and second major in Physics.

 

 


MINOR PROGRAMMES


Minor in Biophysics

Host Department: Physics and Life Sciences

Biophysics is a molecular science. It seeks to explain biological function in terms of the molecular structures and properties of specific molecules. These molecules, the sole building blocks of living organisms, assemble into cells, tissues, and whole organisms by forming complex individual structures with dimensions of 10, 100, 1000, 10,000 nm and larger. Proteins assemble into the casein micelles of milk, which aggregate to form the curd of cheese; proteins and ribonucleic acids assemble into ribosomes, the machinery for building proteins; lipids and proteins assemble into cell membranes, the external barriers and internal surfaces of cells; proteins and DNA wind up into chromosomes, the carriers of the genetic code; and so on.

Biophysics is an interdisciplinary science that applies the theories and methods of physical sciences, especially those of physics, to the study of biological systems. Biophysicists have contributed significantly to the understanding of life sciences. For example, the discovery of the structure of the DNA double helix was attributed to Professor Francis Crick (co-winner of the Nobel Prize in Medicine, 1962) who was a physicist by training. More recently, physicist Sir Peter Mansfield won the Nobel Prize in Medicine (2003) for discoveries concerning magnetic resonance imaging. Such studies can be divided into these different areas of interest:

  • Bioenergetics
  • Biophysical Theory and Modelling
  • Cell Biophysics Channels, Receptors, and Transporters
  • Electrophysiology
  • Bio Membranes
  • Nucleic Acids
  • Photobiophysics
  • Assemblies and folding/unfolding of proteins and other biological macromolecules
  • Spectroscopy, Imaging, and other techniques


Objective of Minor Programme in Biophysics

The primary objective of this programme is to educate and train students with the core knowledge of physical sciences to tackle biological problems. Biophysics students will learn the fundamentals of biology and physics to prepare them for further studies at an advanced level. These students will be capable of meeting the challenges of modern-age biophysics, and will be able to carry out independent or collaborative research work. Students equipped with the Minor in Biophysics will gain an advantage in their challenging careers in research, academia and industry related to the high value-added and knowledge-intensive Life Sciences industry.


Curriculum Structure and Requirements

The Biophysics Minor Programme is jointly offered by the Department of Physics and the Office of Life Sciences for students matriculated in and after AY2006/07. To be awarded a minor in Biophysics, the students are required to pass six modules (24 MCs), of which not more than two modules may be Level-1000 modules and three essential modules namely PC2267 (Biophysics I), PC3267 (Biophysics II), and LSM3243 (Molecular Biophysics) must be included.

Students of ANY major may read the Biophysics Minor, including Physics and Life Sciences majors.
To be awarded a minor in Biophysics, the following are the requirements:


For students undertaking major in Life Sciences

  1. Read and pass the following three essential modules:
    • PC2267 Biophysics I
    • PC3267 Biophysics II
    • LSM3243 Molecular Biophysics

  2. Read and pass three modules from the following (Maximum of two Level-1000 modules):
    • PC1142 Introduction to Thermodynamics and Optics or PC1431/PC1431X Physics IE
    • PC1143 Introduction to Electricity & Magnetism or PC1432 Physics IIE
    • CM1402 General Chemistry
    • PC2131 Electricity & Magnetism
    • PC2230 Thermodynamics & Statistical Mechanics
    • LSM2102 Molecular Biology / LSM2232 Genes and Genomes
    • LSM2241 Introductory Bioinformatics
    • PC4267 Biophysics III
    • PC4268 Biophysical Instrumentation and Biomolecular Electronics


For students undertaking major in Physics

  1. Read and pass the following three essential modules:
    • PC2267 Biophysics I
    • PC3267 Biophysics II
    • LSM3243 Molecular Biophysics

  2. Read and pass three modules from the following (Maximum of two Level-1000 modules):
    • LSM1101 Biochemistry of Biomolecules / LSM1106 Molecular Cell Biology
    • LSM1102 Molecular Genetics
    • CM1131 Physical Chemistry 1
    • PC2131 Electricity & Magnetism
    • PC2230 Thermodynamics & Statistical Mechanics
    • LSM2102 Molecular Biology / LSM2232 Genes and Genomes
    • LSM2241 Introductory Bioinformatics
    • PC4267 Biophysics III
    • PC4268 Biophysical Instrumentation and Biomolecular Electronics


For students not undertaking major in Life Sciences or Physics

  1. Read and pass the following three essential modules:
    • PC2267 Biophysics I
    • PC3267 Biophysics II
    • LSM3243 Molecular Biophysics

  2. Read and pass three modules from the following (Maximum of two Level-1000 modules):
    • PC1142 Introduction to Thermodynamics and Optics or PC1431/PC1431X Physics IE
    • PC1143 Introduction to Electricity & Magnetism or PC1432 Physics IIE
    • LSM1101 Biochemistry of Biomolecules / LSM1106 Molecular Cell Biology
    • LSM1102 Molecular Genetics
    • CM1131 Physical Chemistry 1
    • PC2131 Electricity & Magnetism
    • PC2230 Thermodynamics & Statistical Mechanics
    • LSM2102 Molecular Biology / LSM2232 Genes and Genomes
    • LSM2241 Introductory Bioinformatics
    • PC4267 Biophysics III
    • PC4268 Biophysical Instrumentation and Biomolecular Electronics

 

 


MINOR PROGRAMMES


Minor in Medical Physics

Host: Faculty of Science (FoS) and Faculty of Engineering (FoE)

Medical Physics is the branch of physics that develops and applies the methods and techniques, often from Nuclear Physics, which form the basis of the advanced technologies used in medicine and healthcare today. Examples are imaging techniques such as X-ray Computed Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET), as well as radiation therapy techniques such as Radiotherapy and Proton Therapy, relevant in cancer treatment.

The fact that life expectancy and population are increasing, and the tendency to adopt more affluent lifestyle habits, leads to an increase in the incidence of many chronic and degenerative diseases. For example, the prevalence of cancer is predicted to increase three-fold by 2030, and other aging related maladies will also be seen more frequently.

Because of the rising expectations for better quality healthcare, experts in Medical Physics are needed where specialized knowledge and skills are required in specific areas (e.g. Radiation Oncology, Proton Beam Therapy, Medical Imaging (MRI/CT) and Medical Technology).

The Medical Physics minor aims to teach the basics of Medical Physics and the constitutional knowledge that is required from Nuclear Physics as well as Biology & Life Science, in order to broaden the knowledge of some of our graduates at the interface of these fields.

Those students who aim to become professional Medical Physicists will be able to utilize the solid foundation the minor represents to carry on through the NUS Department of Biomedical Engineering’s new graduate programme in Medical Physics, which is currently being implemented.



Testimonials from our recent graduates


My current role in National Cancer Centre involves assisting in the calibration of linear accelerators used for cancer treatment, performing patient specific quality assurance of treatment plans and occasionally treatment planning for patients according to the doctors’ requirements. This is a highly meaningful job which allows me to apply my love for physics to medicine to make a positive impact on people’s lives.

Being in the NUS physics programme has allowed me to gain a strong physics foundation which greatly aids me in catching onto the novel concepts used in clinical settings.

In addition to allowing me to understand the context of medical physics in Singapore, the medical physics minor programme has also further enhanced my understanding of the various physics concepts applied in relevant medical equipment and techniques through the lab experiments conducted. I would highly recommend students interested in the medical physics field to take up the minor.

Cheong Yu Qian
Associate Medical Physicist
National Cancer Centre Singapore (NCCS)

In my current vocation as a medical physicist in radiation oncology at NCCS, it is my responsibility to ensure radiation safety and accurate dose delivery to cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. This entails treatment planning, routine quality assurance of treatment units and commissioning of new radiotherapy equipment.

During my education in NUS Physics, I was constantly challenged to reach my potential with the support from committed teaching staff and motivated peers around me.

The Medical Physics minor programme prepared me well for my current job with its breadth of applied physics and life science modules that include hands-on experiments in the radiation and life science laboratories. I also had the opportunity to be attached to Chang Gung University Institute for Radiological Research in Taiwan under the Undergraduate Professional Internship Programme (UPIP).”

Joy Sng
Associate Medical Physicist
National Cancer Centre Singapore (NCCS)

Prerequisites

The Medical Physics programme is an undergraduate minor programme both for physics majors (FoS) and other Science & Engineering (FoE and FoS) students with

  • H2 Physics (or its equivalent; e.g. PC1221/PC1221X and PC1222/PC1222X) and
  • H2 Biology (or its equivalent e.g. LSM1301/LSM1301X) and
  • Have read and passed one of the following:
  PC1144 Introduction to Modern Physics
  PC1432/PC1432X Physics IIE
  PC2232 Physics for Electrical Engineers
  PC2130B Applied Quantum Mechanics

The Medical Physics minor will cover relevant topics in Medical Physics including nuclear physics, nuclear analytical techniques, radiation physics, imaging techniques and accelerator based applications (e.g. proton therapy).

Invitations to apply for the Medical Physics minor will be sent to first & second year FoE & FoS students. Applicants who meet the pre‐requisites and have a good academic standing will be invited for an interview.


Structure

The Medical Physics minor programme will consist of the following set of core modules (12MCs):

Module (4MC each) Pre-requisites
GEK1540 Modern Technology in Medicine and Healthcare (for AY2014/15 Cohort and before)
GEH1032 Modern Technology in Medicine and Healthcare (for AY2015/16 Cohort and after)
Nil
PC3232 Nuclear & Particle Physics (for physics majors)
OR
PC2130 or PC2130B
PC3232B Applied Nuclear Physics PC1144 Physics IV or PC1432 Engineering Physics or PC2232 Physics for Electrical Engineers or PC2130B Applied Quantum Physics
PC3294 Radiation Laboratory module PC3232 Nuclear and Particle physics or PC3232B Applied Nuclear Physics

 

Students in the Medical Physics minor programme are required to read at least 12 MCs of modules from the set of electives below, with at most 8 MCs from 1000 level modules.

Modules (4MC each)

  • LSM1202 Human Anatomy
  • LSM2212 Human Anatomy (for AY2015/16 Cohort and after)
  • LSM1104 General Physiology or LSM2231 General Physiology
  • LSM1106 Molecular Cell Biology
  • LSM1401 Fundamentals of Biochemistry
  • LSM2103 Cell Biology or LSM2233 Cell Biology
  • LSM4243 Tumour Biology
  • LSM3223 Immunology
  • LSM3243 Molecular Biophysics
  • EE4603 Biomedical Imaging Systems

 

 


SPECIALISATION

Specialisation in Astrophysics

This specialisation focuses on Celestial Physics and Cosmology. Typically suitable for students aspiring to be physics teachers, it has also an important component of data analysis.

To be awarded a specialisation in Astrophysics, candidates must read and pass the following modules, as part of the major requirements for B.Sc. (Hons.) with a primary major in Physics.


Module Level Major Requirements Cumulative Major MCs

Level-3000

- PC3246 Astrophysics I

4

Level-4000

- PC4248 General Relativity
- PC4249 Astrophysics II
- PC4199 Honours Project in Physics (Astrophysics)**

24



For more information and queries on this specialisation, please contact:

Dr Cindy Ng

  • Email: phynsc@nus.edu.sg
  • Office: S13-02-06
  • Tel: +65 6516 2822

 

 


SPECIALISATION

Specialisation in Nanophysics

This specialisation focuses on the scientific principles behind the technological and industrial developments of materials with advanced functionalities.

To be awarded a specialisation in Nanophysics, candidates must read and pass the following modules as part of the major requirements for B.Sc. (Hons.) with a primary major in Physics.


Module Level Major Requirements Cumulative Major MCs
Level-3000
and
Level-4000
Pass any 24 MCs from the following
- PC3235 Solid State Physics I
- PC3241 Solid State Devices
- PC3242 Physics of Semiconductor Processing
- PC3243 Photonics
- PC4246 Quantum Optics
- PC4253 Thin Film Technology
- PC4199 Honours Project in Physics (Nanophysics)**

24


**Honours Project has to be in the area of specialisation.


For more information and queries on this specialisation, please contact:

Prof Sow Chorng Haur, Head of Department

  • Email: physowch@nus.edu.sg
  • Office: S12-02-19
  • Tel: +65 6516 2957

 

 


SPECIALISATION

Specialisation in Quantum Technologies

This specialisation focuses on the foundations of quantum mechanics and its application to sensing, communication, computation and cryptography.

To be awarded a Specialisation for Quantum Technologies, candidates must earn 24 MC from the following modules, all of which are part of the major requirements for B.Sc. (Hons.) with a primary Major in Physics:


Module Level Major Requirements Cumulative MCs
Compulsory modules - PC4228 Device physics for Quantum Technology
- PC4199 Honours Project in Physics, on a related subject [*]

4
12

Two modules, with at least one Level 4000 module

- PC3233 Atomic and Molecular Physics I,
- PC3288 Advanced UROPS in Physics I, on a related subject [*]
- PC4230 Quantum Mechanics III
- PC4243 Atomic and Molecular Physics II
- PC4246 Quantum Optics

8


[*] Projects are approved by default if proposed by:
- any of the CQT PIs (https://www.quantumlah.org/people/staff.php?cat=research; type “principal” in the search window)
- Gong Jiangbin (https://www.physics.nus.edu.sg/staff/gongjb.html)
- Mankei Tsang (https://www.physics.nus.edu.sg/staff/tsangmk.html)
- Charles Lim (https://www.quantumlah.org/people/profile.php?id=353)

Notice that some of those are not members of the Physics Department: in that case, a co-supervisor from the Department will have to be found. Projects proposed by supervisors that are not in this list will have to be vetted on a case-by-case basis.


For more information and queries on this specialisation, please contact:

Prof Valerio Scarani, Deputy Head (Education)

  • Email: physv@nus.edu.sg
  • Office: S15-03-14B
  • Tel: +65 6516 2813

 

 


 

 


OTHER PROGRAMMES


Physics Germany Immersion Programme

All classical physics originated in Europe, and the defining periods of modern 20th century Physics were dominated by German physicists, or by physicists in Germany. Through the Germany Immersion Trips (GIT) the Department of Physics offers an opportunity to its students of getting a first-hand impression of today's universities and research institutes in Germany, while at the same time making contact with places of great scientific and cultural tradition.


For more information and queries on the programme please contact:

A/P Thomas Osipowicz

  • Email: phyto@nus.edu.sg
  • Office: S12-03-09
  • Tel: +65 6516 6745
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