Postgraduates


Graduation and Continuation Requirements (Coursework Programmes)

Graduation Requirements

A student pursuing a Master’s degree by coursework must achieve a minimum CAP of 3.0 to be eligible for graduation.

 

Continuation Requirements

To continue in a Master’s programme, a student may not have:

  • CAP below 3.0 (but ≥ 2.5) for three consecutive semesters; or
  • CAP below 2.5 for two consecutive semesters.

For any semester in which the student's CAP falls below 3.0 (but ≥ 2.5), that student will be issued an academic warning. If, in the following semester, the student's CAP again falls below 3.0, s/he will be placed on probation. If the student's CAP remains below 3.0 for the third consecutive semester, the student will be issued a letter of dismissal by the Registrar and denied re-admission.

For students whose CAP falls below 2.5 for two consecutive semesters, they will be placed on probation for the first semester, followed by dismissal in the second semester.

 

 


Graduation and Continuation Requirements (Research Programmes)

Graduation Requirements

Master degree

  • Achieve a minimum CAP of 3.0 for all required modules.
  • Obtain at least a grade C in the graduate English courses conducted by the Centre for English Language

  • Communication at intermediate level (if applicable).
  • Pass the Master's Thesis.
  • Attended 10 seminars organized by the Department.

PhD degree

  • Achieve a minimum CAP of 3.5 for all required modules.
  • Obtain at least a grade C in the graduate English courses conducted by the Centre for English Language

  • Communication at advanced level (if applicable).
  • Pass the PhD Qualifying Examination.
  • Pass the PhD Thesis.
  • Pass the PhD Oral Examination.
  • Attended 15 seminars organized by the Department.

 

Continuation Requirements

Coursework Performance

To continue in a Master’s programme, a student may not have:

  • CAP below 3.0 (but ≥2.5) for three consecutive semesters; or
  • CAP below 2.5 for two consecutive semesters.

For any semester in which the student's CAP falls below 3.0 (but ≥ 2.5), that student will be issued an academic warning. If, in the following semester, the student's CAP again falls below 3.0, s/he will be placed on probation. If the student's CAP remains below 3.0 for the third consecutive semester, the student will be issued a letter of dismissal by the Registrar and denied re-admission.

For students whose CAP falls below 2.5 for two consecutive semesters, they will be placed on probation for the first semester, followed by dismissal in the second semester.

To continue in a Ph.D. programme, a student may not have:

  • CAP below 3.5 (but ≥ 3.0) for three consecutive semesters; or
  • CAP below 3.0 for two consecutive semesters.

For any semester in which the student's CAP falls below 3.5 (but ≥ 3.0), that student will be issued an academic warning. If, in the following semester, the student's CAP again falls below 3.5, s/he will be placed on probation. If the student's CAP remains below 3.5 for the third consecutive semester, the student will be issued a letter of dismissal by the Registrar and denied re-admission.

For students whose CAP falls below 3.0 for two consecutive semesters, they will be placed on probation for the first semester, followed by dismissal in the second semester.

 

Research Performance

Research performance is rated in 5 categories: excellent, good, average, marginal and unsatisfactory.

For any semester in which the student’s research performance is rated “marginal”, that student will receive a warning letter and will be interviewed by the. The student will be automatically placed on probation unless he/she has a valid reason for the poor performance.

For any student who has received two “marginal” ratings or one “unsatisfactory” rating for research performance, the student will be issued a letter of dismissal by the Registrar and denied re-admission.

 

Overall Performance (Coursework and Research)

To continue in a Master's or Ph.D. programme, a student may not have:

  • two academic warnings on coursework performance (on probation with 2.5 < CAP < 3.0) and one warning letter on research performance, or
  • one academic warning on coursework performance (with CAP < 2.5) and one warning letter on research performance.



PhD Qualifying Examinations (QE)

QE1 Comprehensive Written Examination

The comprehensive written examination is a CLOSED book four-hour paper consisting of all open-ended questions. The coverage for the paper is standard undergraduate Physics.



QE1 Policy

In Department of Physics, Ph.D. qualifying comprehensive written exam (QE1) takes place in the first semester into the Ph.D. program (normally on Monday right after the recess week). If a new Ph.D. student fails QE1, he/she will need to pass an oral test conducted by a committee formed by our department Head. This oral test is scheduled four weeks after QE1. If the student fails the oral test again, he/she will have to exit the Ph.D. program, by either leaving NUS or choosing to downgrade to our M.Sc. program.

 

QE2 Coursework Requirements

The candidate must have minimum Cumulated Average Point (CAP) of 3.50 the semester before his QE. The candidate must have read at least 3 graduate modules, one of which is the seminar module, by the end of the semester completing his/her QE.

(Note: to pass QE, the candidate must maintain CAP≥3.50 the semester of his/her QE.)

 

QE3 Oral Presentation

An oral presentation to the members thesis advisory committee and public, followed with answering questions.

Important notes on PhD Qualifying Examination 3 (QE3): Research Proposal Oral Exam

  1. The QE3 (Oral Exam) is to be conducted by the Thesis Advisory Committee (TAC) of the candidate, which has to be formed by the supervisor as early as possible. The TAC consists of the supervisor plus at least two more faculty members, approved by the department.
  2. QE3 takes place after the candidate passed the QE1 (Comprehensive Exam). It should be passed within the first 2 years of candidature. Each graduate student is allowed at most two attempts for QE3.
  3. The candidate should submit an abstract of his/her research proposal to the Department, and the presentation should be announced in the Department at least one week before the Exam.
  4. The Exam starts with the presentation by the candidate and Q&A open to public, followed by a close Q&A with the TAC. The TAC will make pass/fail decision at the end, and give the candidate advice, comments and suggestions.
  5. The TAC will submit a report of the decision, together with a summary of the candidate’s performance and the advice/suggestions given to the candidate.

Please take note:

  1. PhD candidate must pass all components of QE, the last one QE3 oral, within a twoyear limit. Otherwise, the candidate may be asked to be downgraded to MSc.
  2. The supervisors need to propose the TAC as soon as the candidate pass QE1, instead of after QE3 as in the past.

 

QE Timeframe

The whole QE (QE1, QE2, and QE3) should be completed within two years (i.e. four regular semesters) from the start of candidature.

 

English Language

To pass QE, the candidate must have grade C or better in English course at intermediate level (for those from non-English speaking countries).

 

Sample Papers


 

 


Compulsory graduate student (under RS) teaching training

  • 6 hrs per week
  • Totally 78 hours per semester (faculty policy: No payment below 78 hours per semester)
  • For whole duration of RS candidature except for first and last semester
  • Extra teaching duty/work can be assigned and paid by department, if department and supervisor are satisfied with his/her progress.

 

 


Medals & Prizes

Materials Research Society of Singapore Medal

The Materials Research Society of Singapore (MRS-S) was created in 1999 as a not-for-profit organization to serve a rapidly emerging materials science community in Singapore. The Society is affiliated with the International Union of Materials Research Societies (IUMRS). Since its inception the focus of MRS-S has been to promote materials science not only to researchers in Singapore, but also to publicize the niche capabilities of local researchers throughout Asia and further a field. As the MRS-society matures, recognizing the multidisciplinary nature of research, MRS-S has decided to donate an expendable sum of S$30,000 for the award of “Materials Research Society of Singapore Medal”.

 

A gold medal will be awarded in each academic year to a PhD student attaining the best PhD thesis in the Department of Physics. The medal will be given out starting from the academic year 2009/2010. The award is governed by the following conditions:

  1. The medal will be awarded to student in the Doctor of Philosophy program in the Department of Physics with the most outstanding PhD thesis. The thesis of graduates in each convocation year will be assessed for this purpose by a Selection Committee appointed by the Dean of the Faculty of Science in consultation with the Head of the Department of Physics.
  2. The medal will be awarded by the Board of Graduate Studies on the recommendation of the Selection Committee.
  3. No award will be made unless there is a candidate of sufficient merit.
  4. This gift shall be governed by the University Statutes and Regulations, specifically, Statute 7 on Gifts to the University and the corresponding Regulation.


For more information and queries on our programmes, please contact:

Sng Wee Lee (Manager)

  • Email: physngwl@nus.edu.sg
  • Office: General Office, S12-M01
  • Tel:+65 6516 2619

 

 


PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS

NUS Sigma Pi Sigma Chapter


Left: A/Prof. Phil Chan (right) was the event director of the Venus Transit @ NUS 2012, and Prof. Roy Patrick Kerr (left) was specially invited to grace the event.
Centre: Prof Feng Yuan Ping (left) presented the Sigma Pi Sigma plaque to Mr. Chong Yau Loong, a representative of the NUS Physics Society.
Right: A group photo of some of the first Sigma Pi Sigma inductees. Mr John Soo and Miss Lim Jia Jia (middle row, second and third from the right) were the president and vice president of the Physics Society, respectively. Dr Cindy Ng (top row, first from the left) is the staff advisor of NUS Physics Society.


It was a historic occasion on November 1, 2011 when NUS Physics Department established two new chapters, one for the Society of Physics Students (SPS) under the American Institute of Physics' (AIP), and one for the Sigma Pi Sigma (ΣΠΣ) Honor Society. We are probably the first university is this part of Asia to have received the accolade and be inducted into the Sigma Pi Sigma fraternity.

The chapter advisor for SPS is Dr Cindy Ng. Dr Ng is the staff advisor of the NUS Physics Society. In every academic year, there are about 250 students studying the physics major programs; the Physics Society is a student society run by an executive committee consisting of 15 members, and most members are the physics students. The society organizes activities like the Mid-Autumn Festival celebration, staff and student games, and many other fun and food oriented activities to help promoting staff and student interactions within the Physics Department.

The NUS Sigma Pi Sigma chapter advisor is A/Prof Phil Chan. A/Prof Chan was inducted into the membership in 1992 and hence became the first Sigma Pi Sigma member at NUS.

The first NUS Sigma Pi Sigma reception ceremony was held on June 6, 2012, in conjunction with the Faculty of Science’s Venus Transit @ NUS 2012 event. The Venus Transit event generated a buzz of media and television activities. Thousands of people turned up for the 2-day event and hundreds attended the public lecture of renowned Distinguished Professor Roy Patrick Kerr from the University of Canterbury, New Zealand. Prof Kerr is famous for discovering the Kerr vacuum.

The Sigma Pi Sigma reception ceremony was graced by Prof Kerr. During the ceremony the Physics Department Head, Prof Feng Yuan Ping, was invited to present the Sigma Pi Sigma plaque to the Physics Society. A total of 25 inductees were received into the Sigma Pi Sigma membership at this ceremony.

 

Sigma Pi Sigma Membership

The chapter receives into membership undergraduate and graduate students, faculty members, and a few others in closely related fields. Students elected to membership must attain high standards of general scholarship and outstanding achievement in physics.

Undergraduate candidates must meet a minimum standard used by the chapter. Graduate students and faculty members may be elected at any time. Students who are not physics majors can be elected, provided that they meet the standards and have demonstrated an interest in physics. Physicists in industry and government laboratories, as well as secondary school physics teachers, can be elected on the basis of their professional record.

For more information about the membership, you may contact our representative below:


For more information and queries on our programmes, please contact:

Dr NG Shao Chin, Cindy

  • Email: phynsc@nus.edu.sg
  • Office: S13-02-06
  • Tel:+65 6516 2822

 

 


PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS

Institute of Physics Singapore

  • Home
  • Student
  • Postgraduates